MONOLOGUE VS. INTERNAL MONOLOGUE – project I

Lying Research, Monologue, Screenwriting and the Audience

Lying 

“What is a lie?

Lying is a form of deception, but not all forms of deception are lies.

Lying is giving some information while believing it to be untrue, intending to deceive by doing so.

A lie has three essential features:

  • A lie communicates some information
  • The liar intends to deceive or mislead
  • The liar believes that what they are ‘saying’ is not true

There are some features that people think are part of lying but aren’t actually necessary:

  • A lie does not have to give false information
  • A lies does not have to be told with a bad (malicious) intention – white lies are an example of lies told with a good intention

This definition says that what makes a lie a lie is that the liar intends to deceive (or at least to mislead) the person they are lying to. It says nothing about whether the information given is true or false.

This definition covers ordinary cases of lying and these two odd cases as well:

  • the case where someone inadvertently gives true information while believing that they’re telling a lie
    • I want the last helping of pie for myself, so I lie to you that there is a worm in it. When I later eat that piece of pie I discover that there really is a worm in it
  • the case where nobody is deceived by me because they know that I always tell lies.

Here are some visual examples of what people do when they lie. I’m sure some of those will become very usefull to me.

Eyes darting back and forth

Rapid blinking

Closing eyes for more than one second at a time

Looking up to the right

Looking directly to the right

Looking down to the right

Bunched skin beneath and wrinkles beside the eyes

Face touching

Pursed lips

Excessive sweating

Blushing

Head shaking

As an example of a lie in animation I thought of the moment from “Brave” when Merida lies to her mum about the ingridients of the magic cake

Monologue

“Monologue in theatre is a speech presented by a single character, most often to express their mental thoughts aloud, though sometimes also to directly address another character or the audience.

Interior monologue involves a character externalizing their thoughts so that the audience can witness experiences that would otherwise be mostly internal. In contrast, a dramatic monologue involves one character speaking to another character. Monologues can also be divided along the lines of active and narrative monologues. In an active monologue a character is using their speech to achieve a clear goal. Narrative monologues simply involve a character telling a story and can often be identified by the fact that they are in the past tense.

I’ve came across the example of the monologue from the film “Gone Girl” which I’ve seen a few years ago and I found really good. This piece is from the beginning of the film and I think that this monologue is so well written that it really allowes the audience to get in to the story

Now for the example of Interior Monologue I thought of Kronk from “Emperors New Groove” where we see a conversation of him with his good and bad self (I know they have bodies and stuff but it is still himself). And this shows us the great conflict which character can have with himself.

Screentwriting

Thinking about writting my script I swam through the internet looking for some tips. First I found out that script writing and screenwriting are two different things.

“Script Writing

Script writing is the process of writing dialogue which can be used in talk shows, news programs, sports broadcasts and infotainment programs. It is also correct to call writing a script for a movie or a narrative TV show script writing, but the script usually involves more than just character descriptions and dialogue. Script writing doesn’t involve discussing the visuals of a TV show or a movie. This is a more specific type of script writing which is called screenwriting.

Screenwriting

Screenwriting is also a process of writing a script, but this is only used for filmmaking that have narrative elements that involve dramatic elements and other components of the film that need to be seen on the screen to serve the overall narrative like the setting, the lighting and movements. Screenwriting provides the visuals that complement what the characters are doing and saying. The mood accentuates the drama or humor that the characters are executing based on the script.

Then I found this really cool video about the importancy of the screenwriter which made me realise how much more I still have to work on my ability of screenwriting. The program looks at the film “Gone Girl”(same film as in the Monologue) and it made me wanna watch it again cause I’m sure that the second time I’ll see much more.

Another very usefull video I’ve found (the same author) about the importancy of the screenplay. This time author is looking at “Moonrise Kingdom” which is a perfect example for analysing Wes Anderson’s style. I find this video particularly usefull since W. Anderson is one of my favourite directors and I really admire his creations. I find everything in the video  really valuable on the journey to find my own style and in order to be able create interesting characters and endearing stories.

Here is my Ist version of the script. It is also my first script made with the use of Celtx which I find really useful and easy to work with (here is a link to the basic tutorial about using the program https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KX06J2cG9eo&t=4s )

          NO TITLE (yet)

script

Audience

What I’m going for in this project is the teenage and mature audience, since my main character will be experiencing the mushroom trip. But the way the story is made also allows younger audience to watch it since there want be any straight forwad informations not suitable for children in it.

http://giphy.com/search/trippy

Referencess:

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/l0NwyLDmsnWVygBc4 [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/l0NwtihTrfVdCfPSo [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/3o7ZeqNIjBAP2SLx0k [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/l0NwOSbGlIbSJJXI4 [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/3o7ZeshpktEcfJaety [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/3o7ZenTH5qkNTP9pKM [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/3o7ZeKGDUnQDT12mME [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/3o7ZeFQyv7P06o7YVW [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/3o7ZeKtMnL1PNc4rbG [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/3o7ZeNenflGQR3GQ80 [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/3o7ZeA8mjDYbdmYCEo [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Animated GIF – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/gifs/l0NwuGFPIqW4g8Fzy [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

GIPHY. (2016). Trippy GIFs – Find & Share on GIPHY. [online] Available at: http://giphy.com/search/trippy [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

Bbc.co.uk. (2016). BBC – Ethics – Lying. [online] Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/ethics/lying/lying_1.shtml [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

Bright Hub. (2016). Discussing the Differences Between Script Writing and Screenwriting. [online] Available at: http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/video/articles/77344.aspx [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

En.wikipedia.org. (2016). Monologue. [online] Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monologue [Accessed 17 Oct. 2016].

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